DIY Gyoza!


For a long time my Australian friends (the ones who can't make asian food) have been obsessed with gyoza. In Taiwan, we call them dumplings or (the fried ones are) pot stickers. They are really all the same thing. A few months ago Harajuku Gyoza opened up in the Valley. When Pham and I went to try them, sure enough they were tasty and yes it was a hilariously fun experience, but $120 later... c'mon my mum's being making them forever for about 1/5 of the price! (Admittedly, we drank alot of sake.) So for Australia Day this year, I made everyone gyoza. It was also a reminder of the multi-culturalism we Australians are so proud of. 170 gyozas later, they were definately a hit! 

So today I'm going to show you how to make your very own gyoza! I'll even show you two different flavours, two different cooking methods and two different dipping sauces! They are incredibly cheap to make, all my ingredients including all new bottles of condiments and sauces cost around $35. This recipe which includes 1 kg of mince will make approximately 170 small gyoza or 90 large gyoza depending on the size of your dumpling wrappers. This may seem excessive, but it takes about 8 gyozas to fill me up. Once frozen, they are a quick and impressive meal aaand, they store for ages! They are also pretty healthy depending on what fillings you put in them.

Here are a few tips - 
  • I prefer the dumpling wrappers that are only made from flour and water. I find the ones with egg make the pastry too tough.
  • Try a variety of different meats and vegetables. You can try prawns and even tofu!
  • Yamaki dashi is a Japanese seasoning that is made from dried kelp and katsuobushi. It is like a soup stock and forms the base for miso soup and other clear broths. It has a umami taste. It can be found in most good Asian grocery stores, but if you can't find it good old stock powder will do.
  • I like to shred my vegetables so there's still a bit of texture to the filling, but for children or adults who don't enjoy vegetables you can pulse the vegetables in a food processor so they're almost undetectable when cooked.
  • Have a few trays/plates ready to freeze your dumplings. I have about 4 or 5 on rotation. Once you get back to the first tray the first layer of gyoza should be firm enough for you to stack on another layer.

Poached Pork Gyoza

Pork Gyoza
You will need -
  • 500g pork mince
  • 1/4 head sugarloaf cabbage (shredded)
  • 25g minced ginger
  • 2 sprigs spring onion (sliced finely)
  • 500g dumpling wrappers
  • 1/8 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon Yamaki dashi
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine
  • 1/2 tbs sesame oil
  • plain flour to dust
  • a small dish of water
  • cling wrap
  • a few large baking trays/plates





  1. Mix all your meat, vegetables and condiments in a large bowl.
  2.  Start wrapping!



    This is the first method of wrapping your gyoza. I like to use different designs to mark the flavours of the gyoza. This one pleats both sides. Firstly put a small spoonful of filling in the centre of the pastry and spread it out in an oblong shape. Dip your finger into the dish of water and wet down the edges of the pastry. Fold the pastry in half and pinch the centre together. While holding the centre with one hand, use your index finger and them to push the edges of the pastry together and towards the centre to form the pleats. You should be able to fit 2-3 pleats on each side. Press the seam of the gyoza together quite firmly.

  3. Dust the bottom of your tray with flour. Continue wrapping and filling up your tray leaving a bit of space between each gyoza to prevent them from sticking. Once you've filled your tray give the dumplings a light dusting of flour and cover with cling wrap and put them into the freezer.
As you start to stack layers on top of each other, make sure you give the cling wrap a good dusting of flour to prevent sticking.

Pan-fried Chicken Gyoza

Chicken Gyoza
  • 500g chicken mince
  • 1/4 head sugarloaf cabbage (shredded)
  • 25g minced ginger
  • 2 cloves mincced garlic
  • 2 carrots (grated)
  • 1/3 bunch chives (finely chopped)
  • 500g dumpling wrappers
  • 1/8 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon Yamaki dashi
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine
  • 1/2 tbs sesame oil
  • plain flour to dust
  • a small dish of water
  • cling wrap
  • a few large baking trays/plates
I know it looks like a fetus.. ahhh creepy!



I prefer this wrapping design better and I also find it easier to do. This only creates pleats on one side and curves the gyoza. Place a spoonful of filling in the middle of the pastry and wet down the edges with water. Fold it in half and pinch the centre together. While holding the centre of the gyoza with one hand, use the other hand's index and thumb to pleat one side of the gyoza and press it towards the centre. Repeat on the other side, you should be able to fit 4-6 pleats altogether. Press the seam of the gyoza together firmly.


Poaching
Poaching is a less popular way of eating gyoza, but its delicious, less fattening and the pastry has a lovely texture. Bring a large pot of water to rapid boil and place your gyoza in. Stir the water for a few seconds to prevent them from sticking to the pot. For fresh gyoza, once the gyoza floats to the top and the water is rapidly boiling again, they're ready. For frozen gyoza, once the gyoza floats, pour in a cup of cold water into the pot. Once the water is rapidly boiling again, then you're sure they're cooked through!


Frying
This is  the most popular way of eating gyoza because of the crunchy base it creates. Heat oil in a pan on medium high. Once the oil is quite hot, place your gyoza in. When the bases get a golden colour, pour in enough cold water to fill about 1cm of the pan (a little more if the gyoza is frozen). Immediately put a lid over the pan. When you start to hear loud sizzling the water is drying up. Once all the water is gone, remove the lid to reveal your ready to eat gyoza!


Dipping sauces
You can make up your own, but here are my two favourites.
  • Equal parts soy sauce and rice vinegar. Add chilli oil to taste
  • Soy sauce, minced garlic and sesame oil - adjust to your taste
Pork
Chicken
I know this is a long post, but when you've made these once you'll agree with me on how easy and great these are. I hope you guys enjoy your fresh home made gyozas!



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